Getting Beyond Bullet Points with visual and audio.

Posted on Jun 23, 2011

If you’ve not already read my previous blog post ‘Getting Beyond Bullet Points (visuals only)’ then I’d strongly suggest having a read of it before you read any more of this post.

Why?

Well for 2 reasons really:

1. The earlier post will provide you with the context behind this post.
2. The purpose of this specific post is to act as a comparison to the first post in this series, hence the benefit of viewing the first one!

As you will have seen in the previous post, using the approach of images and single words in a presentation is certainly visually engaging, however where it falls down (as highlighted during my live session by Laura Dickson) is when the presenter/facilitator is no longer present to provide the narrative – the engaging presentation is now nothing more than a collection of images and out of context words.

Here are the same slides that were contained in the earlier post, but this time with the narrative.

Don’t forget, this is Part 2 in a series of posts surrounding my LSG11UK session.

Part 1 – Getting Beyond Bullet Points with visuals only

Part 2 – Getting Beyond Bullet Points with visual and audio

Part 3 – Bringing in the backchannel

Part 4 – The Learners Voice

Part 5 – Getting Beyond Bullet Points live recorded podcast

Part 6 – Tools and resources

Did you get anything from the Slideshare?

Why not let us know in the comments section?

 



2 Comments

  1. This is where most Powerpoint users miss the point. There are two places to put content in a ppt – on the screen and in the notes. The screen is the visual aid that you will use to help get your message across. The notes are where you put the narrative. That means the file can be sent around electronically without having to have the presenter there. The easiest way is to print the notes pages to a pdf.

    Too many people try to put the notes in the screen part of Ppt – leading to death by bullet point.

    What you’ve done with the audio is fine, and works, but means that you’ve had to do the presentation twice and go through the not-inconsiderable hassle of creating an audio track – beyond a lot of the people I know that do presentations.

    We just need to teach people how to use the tools properly…

  2. @berthelemy Hi berthelemy Thanks for the response to this post and of course I agree with your observations about most people not having the time or ability to create additional audio to include with the PPT slides and that if they used the tools properly that they wouldn’t need to ‘make’ the time or adopt the skillset.

    My main focus during my session was to stress that wherever you put the technical, detailed content be it online, verbally, as a paper handout – don’t put it on the slides!!!!!

    I did however, want to show people another alternative (Slidecasts in Slideshare) should they wish to try it out.

    I’m looking forward to catching up over that beer at Learning Live 🙂

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Bringing in the Backchannel | Tayloring it… - [...] ‘Getting Beyond Bullet Points (visuals only)’ and ‘Getting Beyond Bullet Points (with audio) then I’d strongly suggest having a…
  2. Getting Beyond Bullet Points (visuals only) | Tayloring it… - [...] Part 2 – Getting Beyond Bullet Points with visual and audio [...]
  3. Podcast #15: The Learner’s Voice | Tayloring it… - [...] not already read my previous blog posts ‘Getting Beyond Bullet Points (visuals only)’, ‘Getting Beyond Bullet Points (with audio)…
  4. Podcast #16: Getting Beyond Bullet Points live podcast | Tayloring it… - [...] not already read my previous blog posts ‘Getting Beyond Bullet Points (visuals only)’, ‘Getting Beyond Bullet Points (with audio), Bringing…
  5. Getting Beyond Bullet Points – Tools and Resources | Tayloring it… - [...] Part 2 – Getting Beyond Bullet Points with visual and audio [...]

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