Get your foot in the door – First Aid

Posted on Jan 16, 2012

I think I’m fairly safe in saying that regardless of what organisation you are in, your employees are just as much at risk of having an accident or an ailment as the next person.

  • So of course the ability for them to be able to respond accordingly is in everybody’s interest. I’m sure there’s some form of ‘law’ that states that employers should have suitably trained people and that’s all well and good, but how likely is it that that person will be ‘on the scene’ as it happens? When did that person last undertake that treatment for ‘real’ or under assessment?I’m certainly not saying that those roles aren’t important, but why not augment that role by providing First Aid training / performance support to ‘all’ via their mobile devices?

    If your employees are as prone to slips, trip, falls, cuts, grazes, (and worse) as the rest of us mere mortals then you’ve got a wonderful opportunity to ‘get your foot in the door‘ and prove the worth of performance support via mobile devices.

    Why not take a look at these apps and consider whether you might want to direct your colleagues to them?

    First Aid by British Red Cross (iOS) – £FREE

    First Aid by British Red Cross (Android) – £FREE

    (I have actually downloaded and used this app myself, check out the app store reviews for my thoughts)

    Inevitably there will be some people who do not have a mobile device and will bemoan the fact that you are offering their colleagues who do have a mobile device something that they themselves are unable to benefit from, or they will complain over the fact that the apps cost money – don’t let this put you off.

    Simply tell them to carry on using whatever tool or process they have always used – simples!!!

    And you know what? Even if people don’t opt for these apps, you may have just sewn the seeds for them to look for an alternative….

    Good luck and let me know how you get on

    The blog post that started it all

    Image source

9 Comments

  1. Amazing how something as simple can save a life (hopefully never have the need to!) but with this i can be prepared – how many others can say they are?

    Great post Craig..

    Cheers

    David

    • @InSyncEU Hi insyncey Thanks for commenting. I’d love to see this app installed ‘at source’ as part of a mobile’s OS by phone manufacturers instead of some of the crappy bloatware that we often see. Imagine how many lives could be saved or timely treatment offered if that was done……?

    • @InSyncEU Hi insynceu Thanks for commenting. I’d love to see this app installed ‘at source’ as part of a mobile’s OS by phone manufacturers instead of some of the crappy bloatware that we often see. Imagine how many lives could be saved or timely treatment offered if that was done……?

  2. I know there are LOTS of versions in the US – I think it’s a great idea to have one! I have one on my phone, although I’ve never needed to use it 🙂

  3. I want to have this..Thanks for sharing..

  4. I think this is what most people need and they have to check this out too…

  5. @CraigTaylor74 Oi you! I thought you’d left us for your pals over on G+
    Yeah…you ALL come back… 😉

  6. When open, doors admit people, animals, ventilation, and light. The door is used to control the physical atmosphere within a space by enclosing the air drafts, so that interiors may be more effectively heated or cooled.

  7. @CraigTaylor74 great post and one that as you know is very near and dear to my heart.  You touched on something there in your comment about the manufacturers shoul dbe installing apps like this by default and it has stirred up a long labour of thought for me about how much, as a nation, we can do to educate and provide every one with basic life saving skills.  It should be law to have this app and know how to use it, it should also be law to carry a first aid kit in your car AND have a knowledge of how to use it as part of your driving lesson.  It amazes me how they can put questions into the driving test about water and oil levels and how to change a tyre, which yes they are all important as a motorist but as a “lazy natin” we call on the AA or the RAC to do this type of thing for us (change a wheel at the roadside) but in a time of need (Road Traffic Collision) Basic Life Saving Skills are a fundamental need at times that can save lives.  Just as important is the need to put BLS on the national curriculum in schools from the age of 7 yesr through to leaving.
     
    I genuinely long for the day where awareness training surrounding First Aid is lifted to the same levels of importance by that of other countries, where they have better success rates of survival with Sudden Cardiac Arrests, Heart Attacks, Strokes etc.
     
    We can but live in hope.

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