Posts made in December, 2012

Jumping on the bandwagon. My predictions for 2013…

  As the end of a year approaches it’s time for the blogging fraternity to turn to the tried and tested ‘Top ‘this that and the other’ of 2012″ and ‘My predictions for 2013″ blog posts. Far from me to turn down the opportunity to poke a little fun, here are my 2013 predictions / absolute cast iron guarantees…       My Twitter stream will continue to be bombarded with Instagrammed photos of hot beverages and food. Fortunately I use Tweetbot which allows me to permanently block hashtags. Unfortunately hardly anybody tags their #instagram photos. We will see a new word being made up within the L&D fraternity. Certain bloggers will still rant on about ‘killer <insert any of the following, or choose your own> apps / platform / piece of hardware. Why can’t things just be ‘good’, ‘effective’, ‘worth having’? Any podcast with ‘week’ or ‘weekly’ in the title is unlikely to ever be that, beyond its 5th episode. I will unsuccessfully use facts, data and research against gut feelings and anecdotes. 2013 will be the year of mobile. Again. Apple will release an ever-so-slight modification of a product. Tech bloggers will work themselves up into a crotch-twitching, salivating frenzy reporting….. erm…. on the ever-so-slight modification. We’ll continue to have a L&D wide survey released approximately every 4 days Many vendors will continue to ignore the native functionality of mobile devices whilst blowing their trumpets about how they are ‘leading’ in the mlearning world. A ‘free to use’ service will change its Terms and Conditions. Users will form baying mobs and burning torches will be seen. Certain ‘thought leaders’ in our field will use ever more bizarre diagrams to explore their concepts. It’s cos they’re clever see…. I’ll see you in 2013… … no doubt saying ‘I told you...

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A ‘storified’ insight into my recent Lunch & Learn session

Since I started in my new role back in September, I’ve facilitated four Lunch and Learn sessions on the following subjects: “what is elearning” Mobile Learning The use of technology in the onboarding/induction process My most recent session on onboarding / inductions attracted some conversations on Twitter Here’s a ‘Storify’ to allow you to take a nosey at that backchannel… [View the story “Lunch & Learn – \”Welcome Aboard…\”” on...

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Podcast #26: One month on…

Craig chats with Bianca Woods about what they took away from Devlearn 12, but more importantly what they’ve been able to implement back in their organisations in the 6 weeks since Devlearn concluded.

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My day out to My Learningworx

Today saw me attend the official launch of Learningworx which also doubled as a workshop centering on how to design online learning content. Here’s a bit of the official blurb Take a course. Make a course. Change the world. As the UK’s first ‘crowd-sourced content’ learning centre, we want to help you join in and start creating your own learning content to share your knowledge and skills. But when it actually comes to making a course we understand you might not know where to start. You probably haven’t created any kind of online content before. You might even not be technologically minded. But we believe everyone has a course in them. So here’s how we’re going to help you get started on making your course, whatever your area of interest, and earn some money out of your existing skills and knowledge. By the end of the day you’ll achieve level one of the mylearningworx expert status, meaning you are ready to rock and roll, and get cracking on creating your own learning content. My reasons for attending were: A colleague of mine @HayleyGordon was attending the event, who is a self confessed newbie to the world of learning technologies. Therefore I wanted to attend alongside her to provide some context between the workshop and what we are doing/plan to do within our Organisation. Despite Kate Graham’s concern (Kate is one of the founders of Learningworx)  that she didn’t want me to think I was being told how to ‘suck eggs’, I’m a firm believer that there’s always *something* to be taken away from workshops and events such as these, so I was still keen to attend and find out what that *something was*. Readers of my blog will know that I long ago gave up trying to capture everything from every session/workshop I attend and much prefer to identify one or two ‘Monday morning, quick wins’. Here’s a bit of background to each session along with my ‘key take aways’. Track 1: Content Production Gill Chester is the founder of the Little Man Project and has been involved in online learning for many years. Gill’s going to be taking us through the different tools and technologies you can use to create your learning content, many of which you’ll have already. Her tips and tricks are invaluable and will help even the least technical person get started. The session will include harnessing the power of Powerpoint, using simple PDFs for learning, screen capture tools, video and elearning authoring suites. My key takeaways: Look into Mozilla PopcornMaker Seriously challenge the next request for a screencast of a simple process. Let’s give our people some credit Look into the possibilities of using telephones to provide audio based performance support. (this may be difficult as many of our employees work in a call-centre and their ability to ‘dial out’ is restricted) Track 2: Writing Great Content One of the most important principles underpinning mylearningworx is to help our content creators write great courses. Tony Frascina of Objective Training and Chair of the annual Elearning Awards, will explore the theory of learning design, how to avoid common elearning pitfalls and how to engage your learners with your content. We’ll look at setting learning objectives and also consider how best to incorporate assessments and quizzes, or if they’re needed at all. My key takeaways: Tony’s session provided affirmation around the approach that I’ve taken recently and also provided some great tips for Hayley to act as a starting point for her journey into online learning design.   Track 3: Telling The World Now once you’ve...

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Virtual Learning Show Day 2

I recently attended Day 1 of a 2-day Virtual Learning Show. I thought I’d take the opportunity to post some reflections on Day 2 and in particular each session, with a particular focus on: A key ‘take-away’ from the sessions content itself The way in which it was facilitated (in part or in whole) with a view to what can I re-use/build upon for myself. Overall view on undertaking essentially a day’s worth of webinar/virtual classrooms. Welcome & Recap on Day 1  Presented by Colin Steed 10.45 – 11.00 GMT (UK time) Conference organiser Colin Steed will recap on the lessons learned on Day 1 (29th November) and outline the highlights of the exciting presentations that are scheduled for today. My key content take-away Forget about trying to ‘influence upwards’ when it comes up to implementing virtual classrooms / webinars. Instead, look around the business for problems that are occurring for which webinars can provide a solution (this approach is effective for internal projects, particularly those with a   Converting Your Classroom Courses to the Virtual Environment  Presented by Cindy Huggett 11.00 – 12.00 GMT (UK time) Organizations are increasingly moving from instructor-led classroom training to the synchronous virtual classroom.  Whether you have already started to convert your face-to-face classes, or just beginning the process, this session will help you design for success! In this session, you will learn that one minute of classroom time does not equal one minute of virtual classroom time. Some face-to-face activities simply don’t translate or even make sense online.  Therefore, how do you know what to translate versus what to build from scratch?  And what activity options are available that will help you meet the desired learning outcomes? This interactive session will answer those questions and more.  It will equip you – both instructional designers and trainers alike – to convert classroom training to virtual training using three simple guidelines. Follow three steps to convert face-to-face classes to synchronous virtual sessions Translate classroom topics into virtual activities Design appropriate virtual class activities to achieve learning outcomes My key content take-away Don’t try and include the same number of people in an online session as you would in face to face (f2f)  session. Keep the numbers low and ASTD research (2009) shows that approximately 40 hours of total design are required for 1 hour of f2f activity. My key facilitation take-away Cindy swapped the layout of the session screen a few times. This was useful to see the flexibility of Adobe Connect, however it took a few moments to get used to the changing layout. I’m not saying that I would never change the layout during the session, but I would be very mindful as to the knock-on effect on the learner.   Tools and techniques to enhance live online sessions  Presented by Julie Wedgwood 12.30 – 13.30 GMT (UK time) Julie Wedgwood has been facilitating live online sessions for many years and is a favourite webinar presenter on the LPI Webinar Programme over the years. She is also one of the most highly rated commentators and conference presenters on the subject of interactivity in sessions – both face to face and in the online environment. Her more recent session on the availability and use of digital learning tools for use in live online sessions. Join Julie Wedgwood to explore simple yet innovative ways to enhance online session engagement and keep your delegates active. IN this highly interactive session, explore and experiment with Julie as she shares:  Julie’s “Tell me that’s You”  approach to delegate polls Mosher’s Grid Graffiti feedback Tools to aid learner concentration Webcam...

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