#ContentStrategy #MOOC Wk 6 – Measuring Your Content’s Engagement

Posted on Jul 14, 2015

If you’ve not read my Week 1 post from this series, you may want to read it prior to this post….

I plan to blog my way through, initially this MOOC, and in time through the whole specialisation. In order to stop these weekly posts from becoming a ramble I am going to try and stick to the following headings

    • This weeks theme
    • Key takeaway(s)
    • Coursera/MOOC design observation
    • Synergies with L&D
    • Homework/Assignment


This weeks theme.

Measuring Your Contents Engagement


Key takeaway(s)

I was surprised to see the massive variation in terms of how various engagement measurement tools work/report.

Screen Shot 2015-07-06 at 09.18.45

One site. One metric. Look at the variation…

My surprise didn’t end though, as I discovered that online activity engagement/measurement tools often perform a very poor job of recording time accurately, with one of the Professors stating that the last page visited before exiting a site is very rarely recorded – who knew!?


Coursera/MOOC design observation

I’ve continued to take notes in Evernote and am pleased to see that each video continues to include a Take Back To Work slide.

The MOOC also provides the ability to download this Take Back To Work Toolkitas well as all the videos.


Synergies with L&D

Not exactly a synergy, more a polar opposite but it became quite obvious in this weeks content that the focus seemed to be more on the measurement of the activity as opposed to the impact it had – which of course, is where L&D seem to be trying to move to.

Having said that it was incredibly useful to hear about some of the limitations of server based measurement tools and made me wonder whether the measurement/engagement tools within LMSs, intranets, CMSs etc were also dubious!


Homework/Assignment

This second assignment of the MOOC involved us researching and analysing Social Media posts and their relation to Maslows Hierachy of Needs. If I’m honest it was one of the more convoluted assignments that I’ve undertaken in a MOOC (2 of the 3 students I peer-reviewed, got 50% of the assignment completely wrong!) and felt like we were shoehorning it in, as opposed to it adding real value.

Here is it is, along with my response:

Part 1

In Professor Hlavacs Module 5 video 4,Connecting Your Content with the Audience You Want to Reach, he applies Maslows hierarchy of needs to a variety of social media content communications. The messages fall into the four categories of safety, belonging, esteem/prestige and self-actualization. Using the table below from Professor Hlavacs lecture as a guide (not shown in blog post), go onto at leasttwo social media sites of your choosing (for example: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+ or LinkedIn). You will be asked to find posts that exhibitone of theMaslow categories (detailed below) on thesocial media platforms. At the end, you should have at least two posts exhibiting at least two of the categories from your chosen social media platforms, totaling four posts.

My response:

My chart is contained within the accompanying, uploaded PDF.

Case Study 2 Assignment

Part Two

In 500 words, explain any successes and challenges you had finding the messages.

Consider the following questions to help craft your write up:

Were there differences/ similarities between the platforms?

Was it easier to find certain categories than others?

What types of audiences appealed to the different categories? (I.e. did safety work for young professionals on LinkedIn?)

How will you apply these types of messages to your own content (define your stakeholders, the platforms you will use and a sample message for each platform)?

My response:

Were there differences/similarities between the platforms?

All three platforms that I used (Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube) provided ‘search’ functionality so I was able to easily use search terms to home in on tweets, updates and videos that related to this assignment. Understandably, few, if any of the updates I reviewed contained the words

safety
belonging
esteem
self-actualisation

explicitly in them, so it was important to put myself in the mind of the author and try and imagine the words/phrases that I would have used.

I also noticed that it was easier to identify a users ‘followers/audience’ on Twitter and LinkedIn than it was YouTube (which only showed me the ‘number’ of followers as opposed to who they were)


Was it easier to find certain categories than others?

I found all the categories as easy to find as each other.

I suspect this is because I am a prevalent user of all 3 platforms, so I immediately knew which accounts/channels/users would be likely to appeal to each of the 4 categories we were researching.


What types of audiences appealed to the different categories? (I.e. did safety work for young professionals on LinkedIn?)

I’m not sure I understand this question as it does not make sense to me. It seems that the 2 subjects of the question (audience andcategories) should be swapped around to read

What types of categories appealed to the different audiences? (I.e. did safety work for young professionals on LinkedIn?)

To try and answer this question, I looked at the 2 distal categories

and in particular to the audience for each of the social media users that I selected to represent each. I defined ‘audience’ as their followers and those that shared/commented on etc their content.

The Safety (@GetSafeOnline) followers included schools, IT professionals, web hosting services and police (as well as members of the general public such as myself), although with 8,910 followers (at the time of writing), it was difficult to extrapolate any meaningful insight into their audience.

The Self actualisation (Project Life Mastery) followers included self-styled, self help practitioners (as well as members of the general public such as myself), although with 41,955 followers (at the time of writing) and the lack of YouTube functionality to allow me to see ‘who’ their followers were, it was difficult to extrapolate any meaningful insight into their audience.


How will you apply these types of messages to your own content (define your stakeholders, the platforms you will use and a sample message for each platform)?

I regularly blog about workplace learning, with a particular focus on how technology can be used to help enhance, enrich and scale an organisation’s people development activities.

http://tayloringit.com/category/blog-2/

my readers/stakeholders tend to be those people who work within workplace Learning & Development (training) teams or those who offer consultancy in those circles.

Once I have written a post I tend to make mynetwork aware by postingupdates to the following platforms:

Twitter
Facebook
LinkedIn
Google +

Using the suggestions made in Week 5 of this MOOC around tapping into Maslow categories, I shall experiment with different messages.

The following examples would all link to the same article, but with subtly different messaging ( as seen below).

Twitter (safety)
New Blog Post: #Learning professionals!Stay ahead of the curve by following my ‘Top 3 Tips’ for #success > link to blog postwould be placed here and a suitable image would accompany the tweet.

Facebook (belonging)
New Blog Post: #L&D folk! Discover how others are looking beyond our own industry to better enable their #success > link to blog post would be placed here and a suitable image would accompany the update.

LinkedIn (esteem/prestige)
New Blog Post: #L&D professionals! Discover our Top 3 secrets to help you stand out from the crowd> link to blog post would be placed here and a suitable image would accompany the update.

Google+ (self-actualisation)
New Blog Post: #L&D folk! Reach the top of your field by following our Top 3 ingredients for success> link to blog post would be placed here and a suitable image would accompany the post.

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