Posts Tagged "Rob Hubbard"

Homework time… Rapid eLearning Design Text Assignments

Regular readers will be aware that I am currently undertaking an online Rapid eLearning Development programme which is being facilitated by @robhubbard. One of the assignments this week relates to the use of text within elearning and requires a number of assignment to be undertaken and then posted to the blog section of the Ning site that acts as the portal to all the other brilliant content. However, as I have my own blog I prefer to post my assignments here as it: a) provides more opportunities for wider feedback b) helps to promote what is a fantastic online learning programme. There were 3 assignments this week, the first being: Find some text that is difficult to understand and that contains jargon and or acronyms. Ideally this should be some of the source written content for your final assignment. Alternatively Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page is a great source of content written by experts for experts. Click on the ‘Random article’ link on the left-hand side until you find some content that would benefit from rewriting. Follow the Plain English guidelines to rewrite about 200 words of it in Plain English. Here is my submission for assignment 1: The original article is below: Social bookmarking is a method for Internet users to organize, store, manage and search for bookmarks of resources online. Unlike file sharing, the resources themselves aren’t shared, merely bookmarks that reference them. Descriptions may be added to these bookmarks in the form of metadata, so users may understand the content of the resource without first needing to download it for themselves. Such descriptions may be free text comments, votes in favour of or against its quality, or tags that collectively or collaboratively become a folksonomy. Folksonomy is also called social tagging, “the process by which many users add metadata in the form of keywords to shared content”.[1] In a social bookmarking system, users save links to web pages that they want to remember and/or share. These bookmarks are usually public, and can be saved privately, shared only with specified people or groups, shared only inside certain networks, or another combination of public and private domains. The allowed people can usually view these bookmarks chronologically, by category or tags, or via a search engine. Most social bookmark services encourage users to organize their bookmarks with informal tags instead of the traditional browser-based system of folders, although some services feature categories/folders or a combination of folders and tags. They also enable viewing bookmarks associated with a chosen tag, and include information about the number of users who have bookmarked them. Some social bookmarking services also draw inferences from the relationship of tags to create clusters of tags or bookmarks. Many social bookmarking services provide web feeds for their lists of bookmarks, including lists organized by tags. This allows subscribers to become aware of new bookmarks as they are saved, shared, and tagged by other users. As these services have matured and grown more popular, they have added extra features such as ratings and comments on bookmarks, the ability to import and export bookmarks from browsers, emailing of bookmarks, web annotation, and groups or other social network features.[2] My reworked article: Social bookmarking is a method for you to store, manage and search for bookmarks of online resources. Unlike file sharing, it isn’t the resources themselves that are shared, just the bookmarks that reference them. You can add descriptions to these bookmarks so that other users can understand the content of the resource without having to download it for themselves. These descriptions could be free text comments, votes in favour of or against its quality, or tags which are words or phrases that generally describe the resource. i.e. a bookmarked website on ‘implemeting...

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It’s amazing what you can find…

…… when you really start looking! Regular readers will be aware that I am currently undertaking an online Rapid eLearning Development programme which is being facilitated by @robhubbard. The programme is broken down into ‘Building Blocks’ with this weeks blocks centring around Analysis/Design & producing video content for rapid elearning programmes. It was the video assignment that really got me thinking as I have ‘dabbled’ with producing video content in the past using my Flip camera and the Flipshare software that comes packaged with it, but have always wanted (needed) a reason to push myself beyond the rather simple content that it produces. The assignment criteria for the assignment was: Your video should include: Someone speaking, either straight to camera or in an interview format At least two shots Sound Titling Think about what you want to communicate in the video Think about the types of shots you want to use Quickly storyboard the video by sketching out each shot If you are shooting outside in the daytime you probably won’t need lights If you are shooting inside use one or two powerful lights Shoot your video and record the sound Record multiple takes Edit and title the video using a video editor – we recommend some below Title the speaker(s) when they first appear Use simple transitions between shots Compress your video for web delivery Upload the video to YouTube, call it ‘Your Name ReD Video Assignment’ and add a link to it on the Videos page on the Network. For a tutorial on how to do this view the How-To Guide: ‘The Network – Add video’ on the Main page As a comment add: A description of the video The technologies and equipment you used Any challenges you faced and how you overcame them and What you would do differently if you attempted the same project again I knew that I would struggle to achieve all of these requirements using the Flipshare software so I thought it might be worthwhile having a look inside Windows Live Movie Maker… ………… I wasn’t overly keen in doing this as previous versions of Movie Maker have been….. ‘disappointing’, however credit where credit is due, I was very, very pleased with the functionality of it. Admittedly, I doubt that it will be the first piece of editing software that James Cameron will reach for when he undertakes his next blockbuster. But if you are looking for an intuitive, feature-rich and (if you own a Windows 7 PC) – free piece of editing software, then maybe you should take a look… Anyway, the proof is in the pudding as they say, so here is my assignment submission. As always feedback is always welcome – at this point everybody becomes a George...

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Learning Beyond the Course (eLN event)

Once again I have been lucky enough to attend a fantastic CPD event in the shape of todays eLN event – Learning Beyond the Course. @RobHubbard was our compère for the day, decked out as usual in a gloriously flowery shirt (where do you get them from Rob?) In line with my previous Blog post ‘Small Chunks‘ I was committed to taking away 1 Action Planning point per session that I could actually do something with back in my organisation. Here we go… Ben Betts – And Now For Something Completely Different… If you’ve ever wondered what you can do with a paper clip, a stick, some constraint and a carrot then you’ll be gutted that you missed Ben’s session. But ‘cos he’s a good bloke he’s blogged about it in some detail here. Which leads me to my action planning point(s) Try and sweet-talk Ben into sending me the game that he kicked his session off with (very clever and innovative) Read Daniel Pink’s Drive (Ben referenced this several times and as we have it sat in our library it makes sense to have a look) Graeme Duncan – Breaking Down Barriers: The Ubiquitous Delivery of Thin Client Immersive Simulations I’ll be the first to admit that the title of this session was more than a little off-putting when I read about this event on the eLN website, but once I realised that we were going to be ‘virtually’ running around a Type 22 RN frigate, putting out fires and catching saboteurs I was hooked! It was certainly enlightening  to hear that Caspian Learning have been creating some realistic virtual environments for some VERY security-conscious clients…. interesting… Log into Thinking Worlds and request a demo Invite Graeme into my organisation to demo Thinking Worlds. Ed Stonestreet – Not eLearning Ed reminded us that the elearning industry is worth $10bn and is almost without exception dull, dry and academic. As I work within a highly-regulated Industry I could certainly relate to Ed’s point that it is focussed on those who have a mandate to learn, those who need to tick a box. Apparently only 20% of any audience is motivated and inspired to act, the other 80% may have a latent interest but they need to be engaged, entertained and wowed in order to get them to participate. How can this be done….? Well Ed went on to explain in not so many words the Affective Context model, which I aren’t going to attempt to explain here, instead I’ll direct you towards Nick Shackleton-Jones blog. Ed made such a good job of raising the issue of ‘engagement’ and ‘interest raising’ that I am going to direct our internal Learning Facilitators towards the Affective Context model video. Review the YooDoo tool that Ed is involved in. Rob had promised us an excellent lunch and Holborn Bars certainly didn’t disappoint!!! Following lunch we had 3 great Pecha Kucha presentations, I’ve come to realise that these appear to be a staple element of an eLN event and I look forward to seeing them; who knows I may even present one at the November event (if anybody from the eLN board is reading this, that wasn’t a formal commitment!) Jane Hart – Transforming Workplace Learning with Social Media Jane Hart – Transforming Workplace Learning with Social Media It was great to see Jane Hart again after lunch as the last time we met was at a Twitter workshop that she ran back in the Spring at the Informatology conference. Jane (as always) did a great job of proving the power of Twitter as a crowd-sourcing tool by calling upon her Twitter followers...

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