Posts Tagged "video"

Research? Science? or something more wooly?

I’ve recently been doing some research into ‘higher end’ video equipment as well as the underpinning knowledge and skillset required to use it.

That’s why I was quite excited to see this tweet appear in my timeline…

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The Ones That Got Away – video stories

I’m writing a series of posts that lift the lid on some of plans and ideas that either never saw the light of day or never fully developed.

Here I talk about using our internal collaborative to share a number of video stories…

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Gearing Up For Learning Live

A few months ago Don Taylor  asked me to facilitate a session at the IITT’s Learning Live conference, a request that (as always) I jumped at  for a number of reasons; there are the obvious ones: An opportunity to meet up with colleuages who I have only ever interacted with online To meet new people and further enhance my network To attend (for free!) some fantastic looking sessions facilitated both by people I know, trust and respect as well as some people who I do not (yet) know To showcase my skills amongst the wider industry But there is an additional reason that may not be obvious and may not be everybody’s ‘raison detre’ for speaking at conferences and workshops and it is this It challenges me to ‘do‘ and ‘be‘ something different. As regular readers will know the opportunities for me to show my passion and interest in this area are restricted within my organisation so any opportunity to do so to a like-minded group of people is not only seized upon, but I guess it also acts as a testing ground for all the things that I am unable to do within my normal working day. Not only do I want the content of the session to resonate with the attendees who have (very often) paid good money to attend these conferences, but I also want the audience to leave with some additional ideas as to how to facilitate sessions and workshops in a different manner, a ‘meta’ session within a session if you like. I always find that a reliable way of doing this is to add a great deal of interactivity within the session and in particular within the navigation of the session. Now this can be a little tricky to do as you are essentially stepping away from the linear type of presentation that we all know, that is easier to put together and to a large degree is ‘safe’. I have in the past even managed to tell a story using a non linear approach and allowing the audience to choose wether they wanted the beginning, middle or end bit and in what order – and it worked!!! For Learning Live I have once again chosen to take a non linear to the session but this time I have decided (or as I have never done this before it may be accurate to say ‘gambled’) to take the navigation  off the screen as I have previously done and bring it physically into the classroom, but to then take any decision that the audience makes and put it back onto the screen……   …… sound complicated? Well actually it isn’t and if you’re attending my session at Leaning Live then you’ll see (fingers crossed) how it all works – who knows it may give you some ideas in the future??? As a little clue as to how I’m going to work the navigation aspect here is a short video that I have made to ‘set up’ my forthcoming session See you in...

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A word of warning, be careful…

… as to what media you use if you are ever asked to produce a festive tip for the eLearning networks 24 tips advent calendar Why a warning? Well, because you might just be asked to facilitate a session on it at a future eLN event!! Joking aside, I was privileged to be asked by Rob Hubbbard to co-facilitate the recent eLN event How to produce rich media learning materials. This was something of a departure for an eLN event as it was planned to be very ‘hands on’, so it was great to be asked to be a part of it. Each of the speakers had been asked to promote their individual topic areas for 20 minutes. Not to delve into the technicalities and intricacies of each method, but to prick the interest of the attendees so that would be sufficiently enthused prior to the practical session in the afternoon. (that was the plan!) Here’s what the guys had to offer… Exploring the elements of online communication – Clive Shepherd Clive got us off to a great start by asking each table of delegates to consider a different media element; text, images, audio, animation, video and to suggest the pro’s and con’s of each. This was a fairly simple exercise, however he then asked us to consider which of the ‘other’ types of media would/wouldn’t work it and why. This stimulated a great deal of debate around the ‘mixing’ of media types. Why not give this simple exercise a go yourself? Writing for audio  – so that it works – Tony Frascina Tony conducted a great interactive exercise which involved each us all reviewing a small number of simple slides containing text and an image. As each of these slides were playing there was an accompanying audio track. The content within that audio track varied slightly for each slide ranging from being very similar to incredibly in-depth. Tony then asked us all to answer some paper based questions relating to the content that we had seen/read. I would like to say that I had taken a keener interest in this exercise as it would have been interesting to focus 100% on it, however as I was due to speak next I’m afraid that I was a little ‘distracted’! UPDATE – Fortunately Stephanie Dedhar has done a great job of reviewing this session. If a picture paints a 1000 words, how many does a moving, talking picture paint? – Craig Taylor I was quite pleased that I was asked to speak on this subject as the very nature of screencasting meant that I could use screencasts themselves to deliver the content. Simples! I chose to use Prezi as the vehicle to deliver the material. I had used Prezi in the (distant) past and hadn’t been too enthralled by its functionality, but I was pleased to discover that they appear to have made several welcome updates to the service. I’m still hoping that they will figure out a way to have accompanying audio, in the same ilk of PowerPoint and Slideshare and that they can come up with a way to use a remote presenter, so that I am not tied to my laptop whilst presenting. It is that lack of audio track which persuaded me to record my session and release it in  a future blog post podcast. If a picture paints a 1000 words, how many does a moving, talking picture paint? on Prezi Video editing - James Stoneley and Solomon Rogers James and Solomon rounded the morning off with an overview of recording video and editing. The feeling from some people on my table...

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Video ‘enhanced’ the Radio Star…

Today saw me fortunate to attend my first RSC (NW) event on the subject of ‘Using Video Technology‘ The day started off with the workshop being welcomed by Andrew Quarmby from RSC (NW) via Skype, which was a nice touch as it demonstrated the ‘instant’ nature of video calling, whilst retaining the ‘humanity’ of a face-to-face environment. We were then cautioned over being blinded by any shiny technology, but to always bear in mind whether it added value to what we trying to achieve. A walk-through – talk-through of Skype was provided for those attendees who were not Skype users demonstrating Video calls Recording Skype calls. (Pamela, Call graph, etc) Exchanging files Sharing desktop … and for those of us that were using Skype, John Dalziel informed us that the latest beta version of Skype allows for up to 10 concurrent video calls to be made. (of personal use to me, as it will allow me to contact 3 x sets of Grandparents when my 2 1/2 year old is in a rare ‘good mood’). John also directed us towards a resource that highlighted the environmental benefit of using technology to replace face-to-face events. After a short break we had a look at ‘Interactive Training & Online Assessment’, with Nicola Harper from KAPLAN Financial providing us with an overview as to how they had used WebEx to facilitate synchronous online learning events to a widely dispersed audience. What was interesting to hear from Nicola was that WebEx licences can be increased or decreased depending on the perceived need and that any chat-room sessions can be archived and displayed. S&B Automotive Academy were next up with, what I thought was an exactly cracking example of using ‘live’ webcams to assess vehicle maintenance apprentices undertaking an assessment whilst providing evidence. The clip below, shows a live stream from a garage servicing bay, the quality, panning and zooming functionality was truly superb. There were quite a few questions asked such as Q – “How can a remote video feed provide evidence of something that requires a physical check” A – During any assessment, the mentor is present to provide any feedback/confirmation etc that the video stream itself cannot validate. Q - What do External Verifiers (EVs) think of this approach? A – EVs love the system as the quality of evidence is observable. Q – How much? A – £500-600 (although, I can’t quite remember what you got for this) – I’m not sure as whether there would be any call for this on my site, as it is quite a small site and most of the work that takes place could not be streamed outside of our Firewall, however there could be applications for this to swap working practices amongst our other sites around the world. RSC (NW) provided a great USB key with an eXe resource on it, to provide further examples and research into the use of video. So what am I planning to do with all this newly acquired info? Research and install a Skype recording tool Install ZoomIt (nothing really to do with video technology, but a great resource!) Refer my organisations Environmental Adviser to the Tandberg Business Calculator All in all, it was a  great day. Many, many thanks to all of those who contributed to its success (both in person and ‘virtually’) and I’m already looking forward to the next workshop. Keep up the great work RSC...

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