Posts Tagged "Virtual Learning Show"

Virtual Learning Show 2013 – Day 2

As mentioned in a previous blog post, I’m participating in the 2013 2-day Virtual Learning Show. Whilst I was directly involved as a panel chair on Day 2, I also attended as a participant .

Here are my reflections on Day 2…

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Virtual Learning Show 2013 – Day 1

I’m participating in the 2013 2-day Virtual Learning Show, both as a panel chair and as a participant. Here’s my review of Day 1…

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Virtual Learning Show Day 2

I recently attended Day 1 of a 2-day Virtual Learning Show. I thought I’d take the opportunity to post some reflections on Day 2 and in particular each session, with a particular focus on: A key ‘take-away’ from the sessions content itself The way in which it was facilitated (in part or in whole) with a view to what can I re-use/build upon for myself. Overall view on undertaking essentially a day’s worth of webinar/virtual classrooms. Welcome & Recap on Day 1  Presented by Colin Steed 10.45 – 11.00 GMT (UK time) Conference organiser Colin Steed will recap on the lessons learned on Day 1 (29th November) and outline the highlights of the exciting presentations that are scheduled for today. My key content take-away Forget about trying to ‘influence upwards’ when it comes up to implementing virtual classrooms / webinars. Instead, look around the business for problems that are occurring for which webinars can provide a solution (this approach is effective for internal projects, particularly those with a   Converting Your Classroom Courses to the Virtual Environment  Presented by Cindy Huggett 11.00 – 12.00 GMT (UK time) Organizations are increasingly moving from instructor-led classroom training to the synchronous virtual classroom.  Whether you have already started to convert your face-to-face classes, or just beginning the process, this session will help you design for success! In this session, you will learn that one minute of classroom time does not equal one minute of virtual classroom time. Some face-to-face activities simply don’t translate or even make sense online.  Therefore, how do you know what to translate versus what to build from scratch?  And what activity options are available that will help you meet the desired learning outcomes? This interactive session will answer those questions and more.  It will equip you – both instructional designers and trainers alike – to convert classroom training to virtual training using three simple guidelines. Follow three steps to convert face-to-face classes to synchronous virtual sessions Translate classroom topics into virtual activities Design appropriate virtual class activities to achieve learning outcomes My key content take-away Don’t try and include the same number of people in an online session as you would in face to face (f2f)  session. Keep the numbers low and ASTD research (2009) shows that approximately 40 hours of total design are required for 1 hour of f2f activity. My key facilitation take-away Cindy swapped the layout of the session screen a few times. This was useful to see the flexibility of Adobe Connect, however it took a few moments to get used to the changing layout. I’m not saying that I would never change the layout during the session, but I would be very mindful as to the knock-on effect on the learner.   Tools and techniques to enhance live online sessions  Presented by Julie Wedgwood 12.30 – 13.30 GMT (UK time) Julie Wedgwood has been facilitating live online sessions for many years and is a favourite webinar presenter on the LPI Webinar Programme over the years. She is also one of the most highly rated commentators and conference presenters on the subject of interactivity in sessions – both face to face and in the online environment. Her more recent session on the availability and use of digital learning tools for use in live online sessions. Join Julie Wedgwood to explore simple yet innovative ways to enhance online session engagement and keep your delegates active. IN this highly interactive session, explore and experiment with Julie as she shares:  Julie’s “Tell me that’s You”  approach to delegate polls Mosher’s Grid Graffiti feedback Tools to aid learner concentration Webcam...

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Virtual Learning Show Day 1

As mentioned in a previous blog post, I recently attended Day 1 of a 2-day Virtual Learning Show. I thought I’d take the opportunity to post some reflections on Day 1 and in particular each session, with a particular focus on: A key ‘take-away’ from the sessions content itself The way in which it was facilitated (in part or in whole) with a view to what can I re-use/build upon for myself. Overall view on undertaking essentially a day’s worth of webinar/virtual classrooms. Keynote:  Presented by Colin Steed 10.30 – 11.00 GMT (UK time) The Virtual Learning Show organiser and leading authority of live online learning Colin Steed welcomes you all to this unique event. During his Keynote, Colin will take you through the current state of play in the adoption of live online learning in the UK and Europe, the main barriers that we are facing, and five trends fueling the virtual classroom revolution. My key content take-away Colin recommended Karen Hyndes WebEx tutorials on Lynda.com. I’m going to check out Lynda for any Adobe Connect tutorials. My key facilitation take-away Don’t be afraid of skipping ahead if time is short. Colin chose which slides to drop and then cracked on with the content. A good reminder to be cut-throat with timings / content.   How to move your company webinars from enraging to engaging  Presented by Donald H Taylor 11.00 – 12.00 GMT (UK time) Webinars are getting a bad name. Why? Because they are too often dull knowledge dumps, a tedious background of noise while you clear your inbox. But they needn’t be like that. According to Donald H Taylor, chairman of the Learning and Performance Institute and veteran of several hundred webinars, they can be very engaging – if done right. Join Don as he examines the gap between what people say about synchronous online events and the reality. We’ll look at the simple tricks needed to make webinars engaging and consider whether everyone can run a good event online. The difference between a ‘webinar’ and live online training Delegate momentum, and why polls are often a bad idea Ensuring interactivity in your events The six key roles in an online event Your next steps back in the office My key content take-away Ask an open question early, VERY EARLY, possibly even on the second slide. It sets the scene and expectations for your learners. My key facilitation take-away Don’t be afraid of silence. When asking a question SHUT UP and give people the time to think and respond. Regularly acknowledge comments in the chat panel.   Using Storytelling in the Virtual Classroom  Presented by Roger Courville 12.30 – 13.30 GMT (UK time) Brain research confirms what storytellers know from experience: we learn through storytelling. What’s more, we’re wired for it… we learn the pattern, rhythm and structure of storytelling before we learn the rhythms and patterns of written stories. Our job in learning and development is to impart knowledge and skills to create change, and while we don’t abandon facts, data, and processes, adding storytelling to the mix in the virtual classroom will add a powerful dimension to your success. Join Roger Courville, of TheVirtualPresenter.com, and get ready to take some notes as you learn practical tips for how to construct story and take full advantage of delivering them in the virtual classroom. Join us for this interactive live webinar to learn: What story is (hint: it’s not “once upon a time”) How to choose the story or illustration right for you Three steps to transforming story for virtual classrooms Four tips for uniquely combining voice...

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Online overload?

  Tomorrow I’ll be participating in Day 1 of a 2-day online activity entitled the Virtual Learning Show.     Here’s why I’m getting involved: The titles and content of the sessions interest me (although I’ve been let down in the past in the gap between what was promised in a synopsis and what was delivered in the event itself) I’m interested to see ‘how’ some of the ‘big names‘ facilitate their sessions as I’m always up for stealing a few ideas! If I’m brutally honest though, what I’m really interested in is whether it’s feasible to run a days worth of online sessions. Admittedly they’re not back-to-back sessions, but my experience in the past has always been that of my ‘attention wandering’ towards the end of an hours session….. How will I cope with multiple sessions over a day? Am I the only one who finds even the *best* online sessions difficult to engage with beyond 45 mins? I guess I’ll find out...

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